Yuki Tatsumi

 

 

The East-West Center in one of its Asia Pacific Bulletins has a 2 page report by Stimson’s Yuki Tatsumi that sums up the current situation in the US-Japan alliance as well as any. Tatsumi argues that the long list of “Common Strategic Objectives” that was produced after the 2+2 meeting probably revealed that the two countries not only share a number of strategic interests, but also share a lack of leadership initiative. She is also pessimistic in regards to whether anything will happen in the near future.

Yuki Tatsumi’s work in general is worth reading as while she is quite hard-headed in her analysis, her work is also refreshing in that she does not back away from alliance establishment “common sense” assumptions – in this case the assumption that the current mess is solely attributable to Hatoyama Yukio’s naivety (as easy as it is to attribute to the man and his naivety all sorts of ills).

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Corey Wallace joined Japan Security Watch in 2011. He writes on Japan security-related topics, focusing on issues and stories that may not find their way into the English language media. He also hosts the blog Sigma1 where he writes on Japanese domestic politics and broader issues in international relations. Prior to taking up a PhD Corey was a participant on the JET program (2004-2007) and on returning to New Zealand he worked at the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology from 2007-2010 as a policy adviser. Corey lectures two courses at the University of Auckland. One is on the international relations of the Asia-Pacific, which contains a significant focus on East Asia security issues. The other is a course on China's international relations. His primary academic interests before his current Japan focus were science and technology politics/policy, issues of ethnic identity, and Chinese modern history and politics. He carries over his interest in issues of identity and history into his PhD where he is looking at generationally situated concepts of national identity and their impact on foreign policy ideas in Japan.
Corey Wallace has 51 post(s) on Japan Security Watch